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 Post subject: Gage's Guide: Covering the Basics for New Players! (Repost)
 Post Posted: Fri Mar 14, 2014 12:43 am 
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Reposted from the PC Tactics thread, to help the wave of new players for this version! If you have any feedback on the guide, feel free to let me know. Hopefully this helps out!


Awesomenauts: Gage's Guide
Basic information and advice to make the first impression less daunting.

Lo there! I'm here to give you general information on just about everything in the game to try and ease the introduction to Awesomenauts. There's going to be a lot to this guide, so everything will be categorized by numbers and headings, so for quick access to information, use your browser's search function with the table of contents to zoom around to what you want to know.

Table of Contents
Welcome to Awesomenauts!
1.1) What is Awesomenauts?
1.2) How does it work?
1.3) Game modes
1.4) Setup

Gameplay
2.1.) The (default) controls
2.2.) The objective
2.3.) Playstyle
2.4.) Character Roles
2.5.) Crowd Control
2.6.) Loadouts and Upgrades
2.7.) Maps

3.1.) General Tips

More Resources
4.1.) The Awesomenauts Forum
4.2.) The Awesomenauts Wiki
4.3.) Lydian_C's General Guide Megathread
4.4.) Nautsbuilder
4.5.) Micesmack's "Next Steps" Guide



Welcome to Awesomenauts!

1.1) What is Awesomenauts?

Awesomenauts is a 3-on-3, 2D MOBA, or Multiplayer Online Battle Arena (think League of Legends or DOTA 2). With an emphasis on drop-in-drop-out play, simple controls, and quick matches, Awesomenauts attempts to make a more-accessible MOBA with a unique gameplay style and a charming sense of humor.

1.2) How does it work?

MOBAs are player vs. player (pvp) games that typically involve escorting friendly units to destroy enemy turrets, so that your team can eventually destroy their base. Awesomenauts is no exception, though everything is on a smaller scale than other games. Instead of the typical 5-player team, Awesomenauts features 3-player teams. Units spawn in hordes of two, and there are usually only two lanes of turrets to push (the map AI Station 404 only has one lane for the majority of the area!). Cooldowns on special character abilities never exceed 14 seconds either, so fights are frantic and quick.

The other main feature that sets Awesomenauts apart from the genre is that it's a 2D platformer, and focuses much more on twitch skill as opposed to strategy. That's not to say strategy isn't a factor in the game, of course, but twitch skill is important. Dodging abilities has to be done vertically, and as such, every character has a unique method of jumping. The game is also free-aiming, so to land your shots and abilities, you'll need to have a decent sense of aim involved. It feels like a shooter, and this really works to its' advantage in creating an active, difficult game.

Lastly, Awesomenauts has two additional features of the game: Ranking and Prestige. As you play, you'll be assigned a League (a grouping of players of seemingly similar skill), which affects who you're paired with in online matches. There are 9 leagues, with 1 being the best and 9 being the worst. For some reason, everyone starts at about League 7, so you'll potentially have a slow start or a fast start depending on what end of the spectrum you get.
Your prestige is basically an indicator of how much you've played. As you complete matches, win or lose, you gain experience points. Leveling up results in more upgrades for characters. Once you reach max level, you can choose to prestige, giving you a permanent symbol next to your name in matches. Prestiging will make you lose your additional upgrades, however, so either choose not to prestige or don't get too attached to the later upgrades.

1.3) Game Modes

Awesomenauts at it's core features only one gamemode. The only way it differs are by the maps and by the way players are organized into the match. We'll go into more detail on the different maps in 2.5. The presented gamemodes are Battle, Quick Match, Private Match, and Practice.

Battle is the standard online mode. You can invite up to two additional friends (either local or online) and face a team online. Useful for when playing with someone, but unnecessary if you're soloing.

Quick Match is the same as battle, except that it skips the “invite friends” screen, allowing you to join a match quicker. Basically made for people who go solo, so keep that in mind if you feel like playing by yourself.

Private Match is exactly as it says. You can organize both teams for the match, allowing setups of 1 on 1, 2 on 2, or a complete private match of 3 on 3. Unfortunately, due to the drop-in-drop out nature of the game, there will be bots on any incomplete team, but it's a great gamemode for just having fun with friends.

In addition, Private Matches have access to Customization Options that aren't available in normal online play or practice matches. You can get rid of all droids, get rid of turrets, increase the number of droids, force the game to give you a random loadout each time you die, or even have a team full of one Naut (ex: a team of three Lonestars)! You can really do just about anything you want with Custom Matches, so go nuts and make up some crazy game modes of your own!

Practice is a match against bots for the intention of, well, practicing. You can invite up to two local players, but you can't invite any online players, so this will likely be a single-player experience for you. I use it all the time to experiment with different upgrades, just to see what they do. I'd recommend starting in practice, if only to get acquainted with the controls and the feel of a match.

1.4) Setup

You won't need to change much with Awesomenaut's settings, as the game asks you for your graphical preferences upon every launch (don't worry, it remembers your answers). You can alter the controls, decide if you want to enable prestige, and, most importantly, you can alter the sound. This is a warning for everyone that I can't express enough: Awesomenauts is stupidly loud. It is the loudest game I've ever played, to the point where I need to go into sound mixer anytime I'm in a voice chat while playing. I can only recommend that you turn both sound settings down to the lowest bar, unless you don't play with headphones.


Gameplay

2.1) The (default) Controls

Every character in Awesomenauts is controlled identically, with the exception of Yuri, who only has one difference. Each character can move left and right, has a unique jump, the ability to teleport back to base, a basic attack (referred to as an auto attack, or AA), and two unique special abilities.

The one thing that sets Yuri apart is his jetpack. You can toggle the jetpack by double-jumping or by hitting the jetpack toggle button.

Admittedly, I don't have the PS4 version, so I'm afraid I don't know what the default controls are for it. I imagine they're probably easy to find out through "Settings," so I'd check there if you were unsure about the controls.

2.2) The Objective

The objective in any match of Awesomenauts is to destroy the opposing team's base. The base is gaurded by several impassable turrets that must be destroyed first. You can go about destroying the turrets by defeating the enemy team's weaker units (referred to as Droids), by attacking the turrets yourself (not recommended, due to the turret's heavy damage output), or by killing the other team's Awesomenauts (players), giving you free reign to easily escort your droids to the turrets.

Killing an enemy Awesomenaut will give you 60 Solar (the currency in the game) and each of your teammates 30 Solar. If an enemy Awesomenaut dies to a neutral hazard (a turret, a droid, or a self-damaging move), everyone on your team gets 30 Solar, and the killed Awesomenaut will drop 30 Solar on the ground, where any player on either team can collect it. Dieing will result in a loss of 30 Solar from the player that died. If the enemy team is respawning, they can't defend their structures, so remember to attack when the other team has lost a member!

2.3) Playstyle

Awesomenauts is a very fast-paced game, with small maps, short cooldowns on abilities, and a low number of structures to destroy. The average match takes around 20-30 minutes, or about half of what a typical MOBA round usually lasts. The longest round I've ever played was a massive stalemate in a private match with my friends, which lasted about 57 minutes. In total, I've only had about 5 rounds go beyond 45 minutes in my nearly 200 hours with the game.

As stated earlier, Awesomenauts is a 2D shooter mechanically, and a MOBA in terms of the objective and the way it's structured. The game relies heavily on what's called “twitch skill,” which is the player's ability to aim, to maneuver platforms, and to dodge attacks effectively. The MOBA side of the game is where strategy comes into play. Every character has multiple upgrades that can be purchased as the match goes on. Selecting which upgrades to buy, knowing character matchups, and working toward the objective all require good strategy, and that's not even taking the element of teamwork into effect!

The last element of the game, dealing with purchasing upgrades, is the currency, known as Solar. Character naturally generate solar at a rate of 30 per minute, but solar can be gathered by many other means as well. Solar lies around the ground, where it can be picked up by walking over it. Killing enemy droids results in collected Solar. Killing neutral health creeps (small monsters outside of the main lanes that can't attack and give 30 hp when killed) gives Solar. Killing an Awesomenauts gets Solar. Destroying a turret gets Solar. This lengthy explanation also leads to one of the more confusing aspects of the game: player level.

As the game goes on, a number next to each person's name indicates their level. Every 100 solar raises your level by 1. The levels themselves do not grant any sort of bonus; instead, levels serve as an indicator of how powerful each player is by means of how many upgrades they have. A character with a much higher level will have purchased many upgrades, making them more difficult to defeat. To reiterate, though, the levels do not give any sort of immediate advantage. They only exist to gauge how powerful they potentially are.

2.4) Character Roles

Each character is classified under distinct roles that describe what they excel at. As of 1.22, the roles in the game are as follows: Area Control, Assassin, Crowd Control, Damage Dealer, Fighter, Harasser, Initiator, Nuker, Pusher, Support, and Tank.

Area Control: Nauts who excel at Area Control focus on maintaining control of an area of the map, typically through traps and hazards. Due to their focus being on setting up in an area beforehand, Area Controllers typically thrive from indirect combat at a safe distance. Naturally, facing an Area Control specialist tends to slow down your team's progress (if they're able to set up a position), making them excellent defensive specialists. The best way to deal with these Nauts is to either never give them the opportunity to set up, or to keep your teammates close, so as to avoid being heavily punished should you fall in a trap. Current Nauts: Coco, Derpl, Gnaw, Raelynn, Yuri.

Assassin: Nauts who excel at being an Assassin focus on...well, assassinating targets, of course! These characters are very good at picking off isolated or vulnerable targets, quickly dispatching any foe caught off-guard. Beyond that, Assassins are also fantastic at putting enemies in that vulnerable state to begin with, making them a valuable asset for ambushes. As you'd expect, assassins are great escape artists -usually through stealth or pure agility. Their mobility helps them chase down fleeing targets as well, meaning that you have to be particularly cautious in determining whether or not you're in a safe situation against them. The biggest drawback to assassins are their low health; forcing them to stay in dangerous situations is the best way to deal with them, as they do not have the durability to stay in fights (especially when they're outnumbered!). Current Nauts: Froggy G, Leon, Vinnie & Spike.

Crowd Control: As confusingly similar as the name might be, Crowd Control Nauts are different from Area Control Nauts. Crowd Control involves the use of debuffs to keep enemies in a vulnerable state, whereas Area Control is the use of traps to keep control of the map. Crowd Controllers focus on disrupting the enemy team and inhibiting their ability to properly fight back. In addition, they are very effective at countering initiations by the enemy -useful for turning the tables in a fight, or to save yourself from a potentially lethal situation! Crowd Control is best avoided through good positioning; most CC abilities have limited ways of applying themselves and can usually be avoided with careful play. Baby Kuri Mammoth (a utility upgrade available to pretty much everyone) can be taken to reduce CC effects by up to 50%, which helps nullify the situation, should you find yourself unable to avoid taking the CC. Current Nauts: Admiral Swiggins, Clunk, Genji, Skølldir, Vinnie & Spike.

Damage Dealer: Despite what the name may tell you, the role of Damage Dealer is actually pretty specific in meaning (otherwise you could label everyone as a "Damage Dealer" and be completely redundant!). Damage Dealers excel at maintaining good damage outputs after their main form of burst has been used already. Typically this comes from having a reliable form of damage-per-second (DPS), though this can come from other means (such as Gnaw's consistant damage over time, or DoT). Damage Dealers excel at lengthy teamfights due to their constant stream of damage that continues beyond ability cooldowns. The best way to handle Damage Dealers is to out-burst them quickly, or to use CC to get them away from you. Damage Dealers (usually) require a good amount of time to finally take you out, so scaring them off quickly is your best bet. Current Nauts: Ayla, Gnaw, Leon, Ted McPain.

Fighter: Fighters are, in a sense, slightly bulkier assassins with fewer escape options to compensate. These Nauts excel at fighting one-on-one, capable of dealing good, concentrated damage to specific targets. Usually short-ranged, these characters don't typically handle multiple opponents well without help, as they usually lack a reliable escape option should they become overwhelmed. The best way to deal with Fighters is to either overwhelm them with numbers, chip away at their health from a safe distance away, or simply outburst them with heavy-hitting moves. Current Nauts: Admiral Swiggins, Ayla, Coco, Lonestar, Skølldir, Ted McPain.

Harasser: Harassers exist to consistently chip away at the enemy health with long-distance attacks that usually have short cooldowns, making them ever spammable. These characters excel at constantly applying pressure (and annoyance!) to the enemy team, keeping them in a weakened state for most of the match to make things easier on the Harasser's teammates. Harassing Nauts usually lack the ability to stay in a prolonged fight, and as such, they have multiple ways of keeping enemies away from them should the feel threatened. The best way to deal with Harassers is to either force them into a crowded fight or to out-harass them. They struggle in teamfights due to their (relatively) weak shortgame, and lack the health to shrug off constant harassment. Current Nauts: Coco, Gnaw, Raelynn.

Initiator: Initiators are one of the best teamfighters in the game. These Nauts have access to tools aimed at starting fights in favor of their own team, either by putting themselves in a good position or by putting the enemy in a bad one. Usually this is accomplished through very powerful CC abilities that focus on either displacing the enemy or keeping them in one spot for a short duration. Initiators help set up kills for their allies, and are far more useful around others than they are on their own. The best way to deal with Initiators is usually through Crowd Control or through a preemptive initiation of your own. Tanks can usually survive initiations long enough for their allies to show up and help, though this is risky and not nearly as effective as using CC. Current Nauts: Admiral Swiggins, Froggy G, Genji, Leon, Skølldir.

Nuker: Nukers excel at exactly what you'd expect: dealing massive burst damage in a large area. These characters have devastatingly powerful abilities that can turn the tide in a teamfight instantly, though usually at the cost of having an equally massive cooldown. Nukers go amazingly well with Crowd Controllers: the later being able to keep nauts from escaping the Nuker. The best way to tackle a Nuker is to wail on them while their cooldown is active, as they usually lack an effective way to fight back without their burst. Baiting them into launching their burst before they should have is also very handy, as it (potentially) gets them to waste their most devastating attack. Current Nauts: Clunk, Derpl, Froggy G, Vinnie & Spike.

Pusher: Pushers are the turret-killers. These Nauts can clear droids extremely efficiently and can keep an attack on structures going for longer than normal. Pushers typically deal a lot of damage against turrets through high DPS, allowing them to considerably dent structures in a short amount of time. The best way to handle a pusher is to either counter-push or distract them with combat to keep them from continuing the offensive. Current Nauts: Lonestar, Raelynn, Voltar, Yuri.

Support: Support characters are usually very different from the rest of the cast, lacking in combat abilities and heavily relying on help from their team to get much accomplished. That said, despite their weakness in fighting on their own, support characters are invaluable in teamfights, providing numerous buffs, healing, and other useful tools for buffing their allies and debuffing the enemy. Support abilities are immensely useful in saving teammates, locking down enemies, pushing the objective...with the right team setup, support characters can be devastating to deal with. That said, support can be difficult to thrive with; supporters are usually very expensive, potentially limiting their usefulness until late in the match. Support often requires protection from their allies, leaving them very susceptible to being singled out by the enemy if ever found alone. The best way to counter a support is to prevent them from building up at all, and to single them out whenever possible. An upgraded support character can be a nightmare to deal with, so denying them money at any opportunity (by surviving, killing the support often, or even literally taking solar coins before they're able to) can help keep them limited in usefulness. Current Nauts: Genji, Voltar, Yuri.

Tank: Tanks, as a role, perform exactly as you'd expect they would: they're slow, they're hard to kill, and they're capable of high damage output, making them dangerous to engage in most situations. Tanks have the most health in the game by a considerable margin, and feature abilities to either replenish health or reduce damage taken, making them even more difficult to take out. On top of this, tanks often have access to very high damage outputs and various CC effects, making them quite hazardous if approached alone. So what's the downside to Tanks then? Mobility. Tanks are very slow, and lack a reliable method of escape, should they be overwhelmed. On top of this, tanks are larger than most other nauts, giving them a very big hitbox that makes them very easy to hit. Tanks are reliant on their abilities to survive and thrive, making them (literally) big targets when waiting for their cooldowns to finish. The best way to take out the tanks is through coordination with your allies and to exploit their low mobility. Being such massive, slow targets leaves tanks open to a lot of chip damage and CC effects. Taking advantage of their vulnerability is the key to success, though you have to be careful of how reckless you get in your pursuits. Current Nauts: Clunk, Derpl.

2.5) Crowd Control

Crowd Control (commonly abbreviated as CC) refers to the various debuffs that can affect players and droids. Everyone has access to at least one form of CC, while some have access to many more (usually those who fulfill the Crowd Control role, as mentioned in the above section). Nearly all CC effects can be reduced through CC reduction (via Baby Kuri Mammoth, a utility upgrade available to most Nauts), or can be ignored entirely by CC immunity (via Derpl's siege mode, Raelynn's "Iron Rifle" upgrade, Vinnie & Spike's "Clown's Mask" upgrade, or Yuri's "Spacetime Continuity Device" upgrade). Any CC that does not apply to reduction/immunity will be noted in its' description below.

Stun is basically the most powerful CC in the game. Players who are stunned cannot move, jump, attack, or use either of their special abilities until the stun has ended. Stun is currently available on: Admiral Swiggins, Coco, Froggy G, Skølldir, Ted McPain, Voltar.

Snare is a movement-hindering CC. Like Stun, players affected by Snare cannot move or jump, but can attack and use their special abilities. Snare is currently available on: Clunk, Derpl, Skølldir.

Silence is a powerful CC that disables special abilities. Silenced players can still attack, move, and jump, but cannot use either of their special abilities. Silence is currently available on: Derpl, Leon, Vinnie & Spike.

Blind is a common CC that makes the screen difficult to see for a few moments. Players who are blinded can function as normal, but a significant portion of the screen will go black until the affect wears off. Droids and Weedlings are unable to move or attack until the effect wears off. Blind is currently available on: Admiral Swiggins, Coco, Lonestar, Raelynn, Vinnie & Spike, Voltar.

Slow is a very powerful CC that hinders the movement of characters afflicted by it. Slow lowers the player's speed and the height of their jump. Slowed players can attack and use abilities as normal. Slow is currently available on: Ayla, Clunk, Coco, Froggy G, Genji, Gnaw, Leon, Lonestar, Skølldir, Yuri.

Slowdown/Timewarp is a specialty CC that alters the flow of time in an area. Basically, this means that everything about the affected victim is slowed: attack animations take longer, cooldowns take longer, health regen is slower, and so on. It should be noted that the victim does still function normally (in that they have the same jump height, can still move and attack), just at a far slower rate. Slowdown is not affected by CC reduction/immunity. Slowdown/Timewarp is currently available on: Raelynn, Yuri.

Knockback is an interesting CC that focuses on displacing the enemy by a considerable distance by knocking them away from the area of effect. Knockback is currently available on: Coco, Derpl, Lonestar, Raelynn, Skølldir, Ted McPain, Voltar.

Displacement is an interesting CC that focuses on, well, displacing the enemy, much like Knockback. The difference between the two is that displacement moves the target by a set distance, whereas the distance moved by Knockback varies, depending on a number of factors. CC reduction does not affect displacement, but immunity does. Displacement is currently available on: Admiral Swiggins, Leon.

Cocoon is a unique CC that is only found on Genji. Players in a cocoon cannot move, jump, attack, or use abilities, just like stun. However, they cannot be damaged while in a cocoon either. In other words, cocoon takes a character out of a fight for a few seconds, comparable to Banish in DOTA 2. CC reduction/immunity does not affect Cocoon.

Drop Anchor is a unique CC that is only found on Admiral Swiggins. Anchored players are tethered to the ground by a short chain for a few seconds, forcing them to stay in an area until the anchor either wears out or is destroyed. Anchored players can still move and attack, though, so if you're anchored, don't give up! CC reduction does not affect Drop Anchor, but immunity does.

2.6) Loadouts and Upgrades

Each character has 18 unique upgrades and 6 additional utility upgrades available to them. Before a match begins, you are required to select 12 upgrades to be available for the match: 3 upgrades for ability one, 3 upgrades for ability two, 3 upgrades for your AA, and 3 utility upgrades. These 12 upgrades are referred to as your loadout. As the game goes on, you can access the shop to spend the Solar you've collected on the 12 upgrades you assigned to your loadout.

2.7) Maps

The real way that Awesomenauts differs from game to game (aside from different players and characters, naturally) is in the maps. There are four different maps to play, and each heavily differs from the others. The four maps are AI Station 404, Ribbit IV (commonly referred to as the jungle), Sorona (commonly referred to as the sandworm), and Aiguillon (the likes of which no one knows how to pronounce).

AI Station 404 is a small, confined map with limited escape routes. It starts out as a single-lane map that eventually splits into two lanes after the first turret is destroyed. Droids can't access the bottom lane, so the bottom is usually neglected. The jungle (the area where neutral health creeps spawn) is located above the single, middle lane. The main features of the map are the gravity well and the Hummingbird spawners. The single, middle lane has lower gravity, making airborne players and projectiles more "floaty." A small capsule near each team's upper turret has the ability to spawn several flying "Hummingbird" droids that deal more damage and have more health than regular sawblades. The spawner can only produce Hummingbirds in quantities up to three, and only generates them every so often, preventing them from being overly spammed. AI Station is the smallest map by area.

Ribbit IV is an average, enclosed map with a fairly straight-forward layout. The map has two lanes all the way up to the base, and features a large, middle jungle area between the lanes. The main features are the two Solar Bosses: semi-difficult to defeat monsters that give full health and 60 Solar to the single player that kills them. The Solar Bosses deal heavy damage and have a natural regen, making them difficult to kill.

Sorona is a wide open, heavily-aerial map with a focus on vertical mobility. The layout is similar to a reverse AI Station, in that it starts with two lanes that converge into one. The jungles are located above each sides' top turret. The main feature is the sandworm pit: A gap in the bottom lane in the middle of the map with a platform above it that houses a stepping switch. Stepping on the button will cause the sandworm to pop up below the platform, instantly killing anything under the button. It is the largest map by area.

Aiguillon is a lengthy, condensed map with very limited vertical mobility and a plethora of hidden areas. It has two lanes leading all the way to the base, with an open middle area between them. Jungle areas are littered all over the place, and health creeps are plentiful (whereas health pickups are scarce, to compensate for the creeps). Aiguillon features extremely small ceilings, meaning that you can't vertically dodge much of anything. The main feature of Aiguillon is the stealth orb: a powerup that spawns every 60 seconds in the open middle area. Any 'Naut that grabs it will be invisible until they attack or use an ability, and the affect lasts for 30 seconds.

General Tips!
Remember that the objective is to destroy the enemy base. Kills don't make the game (though they are fun!).

Avoid dying at all costs. Getting killed results in you being out of the fight for a considerable amount of time, causes you to lose 30 solar, and gives the enemy team a collective 120 solar. If you think a situation is risky to join in, play it safe!

Try to stay in the lanes as often as possible. Being in the lanes allows you to clear out the enemy droids, set up pushes, and prevent counter-pushes. Plan smart trips to the store so that you can spend more time in the lanes. Only go back if you can afford to buy a few upgrades in a single trip.

When taking a launcher, you can jump again at any point in the air. You can use this to reach more difficult heights, or you can use it to quickly stop your momentum for a juke!

Don't forget to attack the enemy droids! Taking out their droids stops their push and strengthens yours, making it vital to the match! Clearing droids is also going to be your main method of collecting solar, so the more droids cleared, the better. You can never have too many droid kills!

Learn the character matchups. This will come with experience, naturally, but knowing if attacking a certain character is a bad idea will help you survive and thrive.

Even if you don't need the health, killing the neutral health creeps rewards you with Solar and denies that easy health from your enemy! Just make sure that none of your teammates were in need of them. Some people frown upon this tactic, so be wary in deciding whether or not to use it.

Experiment, experiment, experiment. There are tons of different loadout builds to mess with, so find out which upgrades go well together, and most importantly, which are the most fun to play!

Learning when to back off from a fight is one of the most difficult things to learn, and it's one of the most important. Being recklessly aggressive doesn't always pay off, and can lead to some frustrating matches!

Remember to use the minimap! It's a skill I struggle with as well, but the minimap is one of the most important tools available. Weedlings (Gnaw) and Clones (Leon) act as wonderful sight wards, granting permanent minimap vision (so long as they remain standing, that is! Once they go down, the sight goes down).

Boots and Pills are extremely useful utility upgrades that are highly recommended. They allow you to stay in fights longer, survive longer, chase opponents, flee from opponents...they're pretty incredible! As a suggestion, you should take boots very early in the match, and pills should be bought as needed throughout the match. Don't neglect them!

More Resources!

When push comes to shove, this is still a MOBA, and as such, it's very much a game of numbers and understanding all there is to know about the cast. If you plan to take the game even the least bit seriously, I'd recommend you check out the following places.

4.1) The Awesomenauts Forum!

Might be a bit silly to provide a link, or to even discuss it (seeing as you're already here), but the forum is a fantastic place to learn about the game.

4.2) The Awesomenauts Wiki!

The wiki is a very handy tool for learning exactly how the game works. Damage values, movement values, character roles...it's a very in-depth resource for most questions you may have!

4.3) Lydian_C's General Guide Megathread!

A handy thread that lists all of the forum's general guides in one place. Chances are, if you were looking for a specific type of guide, you'll find it here!

4.4) Nautsbuilder!

A useful tool for planning builds in advance, researching the different upgrades, or displaying any builds that you wanted to show to others. Can be used directly here on the forums with the [build] command in posting!

4.5) Micesmack's "Next Steps" Guide!

A continuation of sorts from this guide, featuring more bits of advice that weren't covered in my guide. Posted here because his guide is on the 2nd page of this thread, where it might have otherwise been missed. Go check it out!
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Thank you so much for reading, and I hope that this makes the first experience that much easier. My friends and I are admittedly fairly new, having had the game for only a few months, but we've clocked in a decent amount of time and understand our way throughout the more casual side of the game. If you have any other questions, especially in regards to characters and mechanics, I'll be glad to help where I can!

Also, assuming you bought the Humble Bundle 8, I'd definitely recommend giving the Soundtrack a listen. Very fun, very catchy songs that have a definite personality. Won't be for everyone, but hey. Also, the soundtrack updates every time another song is added to the game, so remember to check back in on it every once in awhile!


Last edited by williamsga555 on Wed Apr 09, 2014 2:07 am, edited 2 times in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Gage's Guide: Covering the Basics for New Players! (Repo
 Post Posted: Fri Mar 14, 2014 1:26 am 
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You are a god among men, my friend.


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 Post subject: Re: Gage's Guide: Covering the Basics for New Players! (Repo
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I didnt read any of that, But thats good to know. If I get anyone coming to me telling me to teach them Ima just point em here :P

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 Post subject: Re: Gage's Guide: Covering the Basics for New Players! (Repo
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Thanks for this i am sure many will find this very helpfull! :thumb:

A sticky would be in place imho.


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 Post subject: Re: Gage's Guide: Covering the Basics for New Players! (Repo
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I find it kinda hard to belive that this game would be hard to break into... but then again,i came with with a lot of moba exsperiance before this. this is a lot simpler than most.


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 Post subject: Re: Gage's Guide: Covering the Basics for New Players! (Repo
 Post Posted: Tue Mar 18, 2014 10:30 am 
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I still remember when the game came out on the 360, and I found it very easy to get into even with zero moba experience. Heck, this is STILL the only moba I've played. xD;;

The game feels almost exactly the same from when I last played so I imagine it's still quite easy to get into. One of those "easy to learn difficult to master" kinds of games.


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 Post subject: Re: Gage's Guide: Covering the Basics for New Players! (Repo
 Post Posted: Sun Mar 23, 2014 2:08 pm 
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This guide is very basic, and really does not teach much to anyone outside of those new to MOBAS.

Tips desperately missing.

- Avoid Death: Death means time off the field, -30 solar for you +120 for the enemy team. You basically give your enemies a free upgrade every time you die + an opportunity to push. DO NOT DIE EVER. I am not saying this to be funny.

- Stay in the lane: For as long as possible, stay on the field. The game will be decided by the team collectively on the field the longest. This also means DO NOT DIE and plan smart trips to the store (i.e. When you can buy 2-3 upgrades AND you are low on health).

- Kill enemy droids: Primary solar income. Killing droids gets you money and helps you push. You should have 125+ droid kills in a 30 min match. I have had 400+ so dont think you can ever have too many droid kills.

- Health + Boots: These are the two best items in the game. Do not even think about leaving them behind until you have 200+ hours in the game. These make you DIE LESS which is your #1 priority! Regen is also helpful! You should aim to have Boots + 2 stages of pills by lv 14.

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 Post subject: Re: Gage's Guide: Covering the Basics for New Players! (Repo
 Post Posted: Mon Mar 24, 2014 12:19 pm 
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Micesmack wrote:
Avoid Death: Death means time off the field, -30 solar for you +120 for the enemy team. You basically give your enemies a free upgrade every time you die + an opportunity to push. DO NOT DIE EVER. I am not saying this to be funny.


This is by far the most important thing that most players seem to have no clue about. Mind you, probably almost all of them will never bother going to the forums to read it. That message seriously needs to be blown up to fullscreen on all loading screens, maybe then some of them will actually learn it.

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 Post subject: Re: Gage's Guide: Covering the Basics for New Players! (Repo
 Post Posted: Mon Mar 24, 2014 2:54 pm 
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Aye, this guide was written for people who might not have had any idea about the game, due to Humble Bundle 8's massive rush of completely new players. If you're even remotely familiar with the game, there likely won't be much to learn from here.

Will add those tips, though. Thanks for the feedback!

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 Post subject: Re: Gage's Guide: Covering the Basics for New Players! (Repo
 Post Posted: Tue Mar 25, 2014 2:04 am 
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williamsga555 wrote:
Aye, this guide was written for people who might not have had any idea about the game, due to Humble Bundle 8's massive rush of completely new players. If you're even remotely familiar with the game, there likely won't be much to learn from here.

Will add those tips, though. Thanks for the feedback!

Theres alot of stuff here that I wish I had learned far earlier than I had though. And someone learning not to feed 10 games earlier than they would have otherwise can be the deciding factor in someone leaving the game for good or not.

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